Store

Products tagged with: product catalog

Pages: first pageprev page9 10 11 12 13 14

Tween Hobo: Off the Rails

Tween Hobo: Off the Rails
$9,999.00

A hilarious and irreverent illustrated book based on the popular Twitter feed (@tweenhobo), featuring a young spunky girl who packs up her glitter pens and sneaks out of math class one Monday afternoon to traverse the railroads in search of freedom, adventure, and her own personal obsession: Justin Bieber tickets. Get ready to laugh and learn with the littlest hobo. She's only twelve years old, but a hard twelve. You'll meet her friends: Stumptown Jim (a hero who tried his best to homeschool her on the road); Tin Cap Earl (who's always up for shooting a Call Me Maybe parody video in a graveyard); Toothpick Frank (who loves Pinterest); Salt Chunk Annie (a woman of the night, whatever that means) and Hot Johnny Two-Cakes (who Tween Hobo swears she does NOT have a crush on). Find out how she survives, thanks in part to the kindness of park rangers. You'll hear her take on major cultural events (I go off a fiscal cliff every time I go near a Claire's.). And you'll enjoy beautiful hand-rendered illustrations that bring out the beauty in her wordsjust like how eyeliner makes a hobo's look really pop. Often snarky and frequently ridiculous, this imaginative journal-like book includes maps, jokes, laughs, doodles, tips, hobo symbols (House with a triangle on top means PIZZA PARTY!!!), games, stories, and more. So grab your iPhone and wrap it in a handkerchief, tie it to a stick, and let's roll!

Waiting for Teddy Williams

Waiting for Teddy Williams
$14.99

A vivid portrait of a young man's coming of age in an America that is almost gone, Waiting for Teddy Williams has been hailed by Ernest Hebert as "ranking with Huckleberry Finn in heart, spirit, and insight into the American character." The book begins on the eighth birthday of Ethan "E.A." Allen in the remote village of Kingdom Common, Vermont. Noted for its fervent, if unrequited, devotion to the Boston Red Sox, the village sports a replica of Fenway Park's Green Monster on top of the local baseball bat factory. Here, in a region that lags decades behind the rest of New England, E.A. lives with his honky-tonk mother, Gypsy Lee, and the acid-tongued Gran, wheelchair-bound since the Sox's heart-wrenching playoff loss to the Yankees in 1978. Homeschooled, fatherless, and living on the wrong side of the tracks, E.A. is an outcast in his own town. Haunted by a dark mystery in his family's past, he has only one close friend to talk it over with, a statue of his namesake on the village green. Into the world of the Allen family comes a drifter named Teddy, who is determined to do one decent thing in his life by teaching E.A. everything he knows about baseball. As E.A. grows up and learns the secrets of the game, we get to know Kingdom Common and its flinty, colorful people. We also meet the incomparable manager of the Red Sox, the Legendary Spence, "the winningest big-league manager never to win a World Series," and his macaw, Curse of the Bambino. When the Sox's new owner vows to move the team to Hollywood if they lose the Series again, Spence, his pitching corps decimated by injuries, has to take a chance on a young nobody from Vermont.

What Matters?

What Matters?
$31.99

Over the past decade, religious, secular, and spiritual distinctions have broken down, forcing scholars to rethink secularity and its relationship to society. Since classifying a person, activity, or experience as religious or otherwise is an important act of valuation, one that defines the characteristics of a group and its relation to others, scholars are struggling to recast such concepts in an increasingly ambiguous, pluralistic world. This collection considers religious and secular categories and what they mean to those who seek valuable, ethical lives. As they investigate how individuals and groups determine significance, set goals, and attribute meaning, contributors illustrate the ways in which religious, secular, and spiritual designations serve as markers of value. Reflecting on recent ethnographic and historical research, chapters explore contemporary psychical research and liberal American homeschooling; the work of nineteenth and early-twentieth-century American psychologists and French archaeologists; the role of contemporary humanitarian and volunteer organizations based in Europe and India; and the prevalence of highly mediated and spiritualized publics, from international psy-trance festivals to Ghanaian national political contexts. Contributors particularly focus on the role ambivalence, attachment, and disaffection in the formation of religious, secular, and spiritual identities, resetting research on secular society and contemporary religious life while illuminating what matters in the lives of ordinary individuals.

Who Made God?

Who Made God?
$8.99

A delightful book for young children about God. It will provide encouragement that they are never alone in life for God is always there, he is awesome, and he loves us.'Excellent for Homeschool Use'

Women Heroes of World War I

Women Heroes of World War I
$12.99

A commemoration of brave yet largely forgotten women who served in the First World WarIn time for the 2014 centennial of the start of the Great War, this book brings to life the brave and often surprising exploits of 16 fascinating women from around the world who served their countries at a time when most of them didn't even have the right to vote. Readers meet 17-year-old Frenchwoman Emilienne Moreau, who assisted the Allies as a guide and set up a first-aid post in her home to attend to the wounded; Russian peasant Maria Bochkareva, who joined the Imperial Russian Army by securing the personal permission of Tsar Nicholas II, was twice wounded in battle and decorated for bravery, and created and led the all-women combat unit the Women's Battalion of Death on the eastern front; and American journalist Madeleine Zabriskie Doty, who risked her life to travel twice to Germany during the war in order to report back the truth, whatever the cost. These and other suspense-filled stories of brave girls and women are told through the use of engaging narrative, dialogue, direct quotes, and document and diary excerpts to lend authenticity and immediacy. Introductory material opens each section to provide solid historical context, and each profile includes informative sidebars and Learn More lists of relevant books and websites, making this a fabulous resource for students, teachers, parents, libraries, and homeschoolers.

Write Naked

Write Naked
$7.99

Sixteen-year-old Victor, a thoughtful loner who tries to live his life "under the radar," wants to test out the saying "You have to be naked to write." When he sneaks off with an old Royal typewriter to his uncle's cabin deep in the Vermont woods and strips off his clothes, he expects Thoreau-like solitude. What he gets is something elseboth funny and, as his high school English teacher likes to say, "transformative." For he discovers a face in the window watching himRose Anna, a homeschooled free spirit with an antique fountain pen and a passion to save the planet. Their unexpected encounter marks the beginning of an inspired writing partnershipand a relationship as timeless and eager as the Vermont woods in spring. A strikingly original debut novel that introduces two storytellers with different kinds of tales: onein Victor's unforgettable voicea quirky, contemporary love story; the otherby Rose Annaan ecological fantasy featuring a tiny heroic newt. Together, the teens explore the possibility of connections to one another, the woods outside, and the world beyond. Write Naked is a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

You Can't Come in Here!

You Can't Come in Here!
$6.99

Emily Hunterloves hanging out with her new neighbors.From their decked-out rec room to their almost-professional guitar playing, Drew and Vicky Strig are super cool. The only bummer is that Drew and Vicky are homeschooled and Emily's other friends haven't gotten to know them yet. So Emily comes up with a plan for everyone to meet--a big party and sleepover at her house! But as Emily gets ready for the party, she begins to wonder about Drew and Vicky. They won't let Emily into certain rooms in their house. And a wolf howls on their lawn every night. Is it only Emily's overactive imagination or are the new neighbors more than just a little strange?

You Can't Come In Here!

You Can't Come In Here!
$5.99

Emily Hunter loves hanging out with her new neighbours. From their decked-out chill-out room to their almost-professional guitar playing, Drew and Vicky Strig are super cool. The only bummer is that Drew and Vicky are homeschooled and Emily's other friends haven't got to know them yet. So Emily comes up with a plan for everyone to meet - a big party and sleepover at her house! But as Emily gets ready for the party, she begins to wonder about Drew and Vicky. They won't let Emily into certain rooms in their house. And a wolf howls on their lawn every night. Is it only Emily's overactive imagination or are the new neighbours more than just a little strange?

You Can't Come In Here!

You Can't Come In Here!
$8.99

Emily Hunter loves hanging out with her new neighbours. From their decked-out chill-out room to their almost-professional guitar playing, Drew and Vicky Strig are super cool. The only bummer is that Drew and Vicky are homeschooled and Emily's other friends haven't got to know them yet. So Emily comes up with a plan for everyone to meet - a big party and sleepover at her house! But as Emily gets ready for the party, she begins to wonder about Drew and Vicky. They won't let Emily into certain rooms in their house. And a wolf howls on their lawn every night. Is it only Emily's overactive imagination or are the new neighbours more than just a little strange?

You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)

You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)
$10.99

The Internet isn't all cat videos. There's also Felicia Day - violinist, filmmaker, Internet entrepreneur, compulsive gamer and former lonely homeschooled girl who overcame her isolated childhood to become the ruler of a new world . . . or at least semi-influential in the world of Internet geeks and Goodreads book clubs. After growing up in the south where she was 'homeschooled for hippie reasons', Felicia moved to Hollywood to pursue her dream of becoming an actress and was immediately typecast as a crazy cat-lady secretary. But Felicia's misadventures in Hollywood led her to produce her own web series, own her own production company and become an Internet star. Felicia's short-ish life and her rags-to-riches rise to Internet fame launched her career as one of the most influential creators in new media. Now, Felicia's strange world is filled with thoughts on creativity, video games, and a dash of mild feminist activism - just like her memoir. Hilarious and inspirational, You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is proof that everyone should embrace what makes them different and be brave enough to share it with the world, because anything is possible now - even for a digital misfit.

You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)

You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)
$22.84

The Internet isn't all cat videos. There's also Felicia Day - violinist, filmmaker, Internet entrepreneur, compulsive gamer and former lonely homeschooled girl who overcame her isolated childhood to become the ruler of a new world . . . or at least semi-influential in the world of Internet geeks and Goodreads book clubs. After growing up in the south where she was 'homeschooled for hippie reasons', Felicia moved to Hollywood to pursue her dream of becoming an actress and was immediately typecast as a crazy cat-lady secretary. But Felicia's misadventures in Hollywood led her to produce her own web series, own her own production company and become an Internet star. Felicia's short-ish life and her rags-to-riches rise to Internet fame launched her career as one of the most influential creators in new media. Now, Felicia's strange world is filled with thoughts on creativity, video games, and a dash of mild feminist activism - just like her memoir. Hilarious and inspirational, You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is proof that everyone should embrace what makes them different and be brave enough to share it with the world, because anything is possible now - even for a digital misfit.

Pages: first pageprev page9 10 11 12 13 14
 
 

Comments are closed.