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The Last

Josephine Cousteau is a nine-year-old girl who lives in a time when all children are homeschooled through a virtual, web-based program. Having no siblings, extended family, or friends, Jo's life is very lonely. She loves her parents, but her father, a famous oceanographer, is gone for long periods of time, working on a mysterious project. He promises Jo, however, that her life is going to change. It does, but not even her father is prepared for how much! The Last follows Jo through her extraordinary life, finding out the truth about her father's project, facing the terrible death of a parent, and learning the precious value of friendship, faith, and love. Through the monumental and not-so-monumental experiences that mark the milestones in her life, Jo does much more than survive!

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