Homeschool: An American History


DIVDIVPThis is a lively account of one of the most important and overlooked themes in American education. Beginning in the colonial period and working to the present, Gaither describes in rich detail how the home has been used as the base for education of all kinds. The last five chapters focus especially on the modern homeschooling movement and offer the most comprehensive and authoritative account of it ever written. Readers will learn how and why homeschooling emerged when it did, where it has been, and where it may be going./PDIVPlease visit Gaither’s blog here:A href=http://gaither.wordpress.com/homeschool-an-american-history/http://gaither.wordpress.com/homeschool-an-american-history//AP /P/DIVDIVDIVDIVPThe Family State, 1600-1776 * The Family Nation: 1776-1860 * The Eclipse of the Fireside, 1865-1930 * Why Homeschooling Happened, 1945-1990 * Three Homeschooling Pioneers * The Changing of the Guard, 1983-1998 * Making it Legal * Homeschooling and the Return of Domestic Education, 1998-2008/PDIVPThe Family State, 1600-1776 * The Family Nation: 1776-1860 * The Eclipse of the Fireside, 1865-1930 * Why Homeschooling Happened, 1945-1990 * Three Homeschooling Pioneers * The Changing of the Guard, 1983-1998 * Making it Legal * Homeschooling and the Return of Domestic Education, 1998-2008/P/DIVDIVDIVDIVPThis is a thoughtful, capacious account of what is surely among the most important educational movements of our time. Home education is not only or even primarily about the quality of children’s academic instruction. It illuminates far larger problems in American society: the contradiction between home and work for contemporary mothers; disagreements about the proper place of religion in civic and political life; and the puzzle of cultural difference and its ethical accommodation in formal organizations of all kinds. Gaither understands all of this and make

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